Stavropol blogger is on trial for the phrase “there is no God”

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In Stavropol, hearing started on the criminal case against the blogger Victor Krasnov, whose is accused of insulting the feelings of believers. In October 2014, during a debate in one of the groups on VKontakte social network, Krasnov wrote the phrase “there is no God”, and called the Bible “a collection of Jewish tales”.

A human rights activist Pavel Chikov wrote about the beginning of the proceedings on Facebook.

“Hearing for the criminal case have started by a judge of Industrial district of Stavropol. A blogger Victor Krasnov from Stavropol is sued according to the new edition of Article 148 of the Criminal Code (Insulting the feelings of believers), that was adopted after the case of Pussy Riot,” – he wrote.

It was reported that atheistic statements of Krasnov insulted his two companions, who complained to the police. By the end of the year the investigation department for Industrial district of Stavropol handed over a charge under the article of insulting the feelings of believers to the prosecutor’s office. Krasnov could face up to 3 years of imprisonment in a penal colony.

As told by Krasnov, a linguistic expertise was carried out. In expert opinion, the statement does not refer to the people, but rather to religious dogmas, and therefore is no insult to the dignity of the subjects. However, the expert continues, “remarks are insulting Orthodox Christianity, and aimed at humiliation (insult) of the religious feelings of believers”.

Also, in an interview with Grani.Ru Krasnov said that he started receiving anonymous threats over the phone after the dispute about God on the social network.

The law on insulting the feelings of believers was adopted by the State Duma in the summer of 2013. The document was submitted to the Duma in 2012, shortly after the Court of First Instance sentenced 3 participants of the band Pussy Riot, who performed a “Mother of God, Chase Putin Away!” in the Christ the Savior Cathedral in Moscow.

Source: BBC